voidberry:

on the last day of class we let the kids write on the walls of the pottery studio.
some of my favorites were: “boo to the dudes who shut us down”, “don’t tear down cas”, and “you’re mean for shutting us down”.

This place was my home for 17 years.  I still can’t believe someone would sell it off.

voidberry:

on the last day of class we let the kids write on the walls of the pottery studio.

some of my favorites were: “boo to the dudes who shut us down”, “don’t tear down cas”, and “you’re mean for shutting us down”.

This place was my home for 17 years.  I still can’t believe someone would sell it off.

Seventeen years

and it all comes down to this?

I can’t believe I might never see this place again.

Yeah, so the center on the Upper East Side doesn't fail to meet the mission statement?

The Upper East Side is an affluent neighborhood.  Sure, it’s closer to Harlem than Greenwich village, and maybe its racial demographics are slightly more diverse.  but the fact of the matter is that the racial and economic diversity in Greenwich Village is being squashed by rich (white) people buying luxury condos that just won’t stop popping up in the area.  The area was primarily middle-class, but because of new developments and rent hikes, everyone is forced to be really rich…or really poor.  And it’s clearly impossible to have a family that is both white and poor.

...Are you fucking KIDDING me?

So, did NYU buy it?  Or is it going to be a condo?

Fuck all of this shit.

Obviously, real estate is way more important than children.  Obviously.

today I learned that the tables in the Philip Coltoff Center woodshop are 120 years old.

3 notes

"Why do you have tape on your toes?"

One of my campers asked to another.

"It’s to fix them from…I don’t wanna talk about it.  It runs in my family."

They all decided that, on Monday, they want to wear tape on their big toes in solidarity.

I fucking love these kids.

Pretty sure this is a picture of the guy who sold the Philip Coltoff center to NYU.
If he could see beyond the $6 million apartments, maybe he’d see my campers.  They’re of every racial, national, religious, medical, and financial background.  They have two parents, one parent, no parents, brothers and sisters who need to be fed and cared for (maybe they have to find new prosthetic limbs, maybe they want to find better schools, maybe they haven’t quite learned how to speak and express and control themselves, or maybe mom/dad/grandma is out job hunting so junior is left to figure out how to stay entertained and alive).
But he doesn’t read people, or even mission statements.  He only reads dollar signs.
But he 

Pretty sure this is a picture of the guy who sold the Philip Coltoff center to NYU.

If he could see beyond the $6 million apartments, maybe he’d see my campers.  They’re of every racial, national, religious, medical, and financial background.  They have two parents, one parent, no parents, brothers and sisters who need to be fed and cared for (maybe they have to find new prosthetic limbs, maybe they want to find better schools, maybe they haven’t quite learned how to speak and express and control themselves, or maybe mom/dad/grandma is out job hunting so junior is left to figure out how to stay entertained and alive).

But he doesn’t read people, or even mission statements.  He only reads dollar signs.

But he 

Today, we gave the kids a typewriter.

"It’s from the 20s or 30s," the instructor told us and cracked open its case.  It smelled like my grandmother’s jewelry box.

The campers, born in the late 90s, knew what typewriters were.  They obsessed over its heavy keys and searched desperately for the number 1.

"Use the L!  Lowercase L!"
"Yeah, that looks like a 1."

The instructor smiled.  ”That’s exactly what you have to use.”

They typed passages out of books.  They wrote letters to counselors and each other.  They set up an entire postal service.

For a good ten minutes, not one cell phone was mentioned.

(If I Believed in Luck and Blessings)

Today was day two of Visual Arts Camp orientation.  The entire staff was paid to run around the Metropolitan Museum of Art, finding and drawing details in pieces.  Starting next week, we get to do the same, but with about 90 kids between us.  

This is the whole summer.

The director of the Philip Coltoff Center came to our orientation yesterday.  We had bagels, fruit, and coffee.  Surveying the room, he smiled as he recognized what he called the core group of returners.  He told us that the center had been open for 119 years.

"This is the last one, so let’s make it the best one yet."

We were calm.  Surprisingly calm.  Deep down, everyone is terrified about the camps, day cares, nursery schools, afterschool programs, and community services that will be ended once the center closes.  

"The best way to make sure this is a good summer is to remember: if you’re not having fun, the kids aren’t having fun.  So if you’re not having fun, take a step back and figure out why."

We will do our jobs now and cry later.

Camp orientation tomorrow!  I submitted this one, so I figure I’ll celebrate my last few peaceful days before the onslaught.
Here’s to an awesome summer, full of bad parents and awesome kids.

Camp orientation tomorrow!  I submitted this one, so I figure I’ll celebrate my last few peaceful days before the onslaught.

Here’s to an awesome summer, full of bad parents and awesome kids.

(Source: fyeahcampcounselorloon)

oh my god oh my god oh my god

8:30 AM-1:00 PM, Arts Camp

2:00 PM-10:00 PM, NYPIRG

This is kind of scary.  I might die.